nothing to express

B. — (…) The only thing disturbed by the revolutionaries Matisse and Tal Coat is a certain order on the plane of the feasible.
D. — What other plane can there be for the maker?
B. — Logically none. Yet I speak of an art turning from it in disgust, weary of puny exploits, weary of pretending to be able, of being able, of doing a little better the same old thing, of going a little further along a dreary road.
D. — And preferring what?
B. — The expression that there is nothing to express, nothing with which to express, nothing from which to express, no power to express, no desire to express, together with the obligation to express.
D. — But that is a violently extreme and personal point of view, of no help to us in the matter of Tal Coat.
B. —
D. — Perhaps that is enough for to-day

Beckett’s Three Dialogues with Georges Duthuit

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